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I am as sober as I can be when I bring this wacky thing up

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BelleVUe
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I am as sober as I can be when I bring this wacky thing up

Postby BelleVUe » Thu Aug 09, 2018 6:26 pm

This is going to sound like it came from Neptune, and I apologize if any Neptunians out there feel offended, but here goes.

I see where home schooled kids have been participating in high school sports in the cities where they live. Tim Tebow is the most famous home-schooled sports star.

What if we carried this to the collegiate level, not with home schooled kids but with kids going to places like Argosy, the University of Phoenix, and other schools?

I could see two different options here. First, there could be a University of Phoenix at Nashville team just like there are dozens of Cal State Universities, State Universities of New York, and other directional schools. A group of 12 basketball playing kids could compete at the Division 3 level.

I don't know how this works out, but Grand Canyon University has both an on-campus and distance learning program. Can the distance learners that live close enough participate in GCU athletics?

Obviously the State of Arizona is trying to corner this market, because Arizona State also has this option. I get ads for them every week.

The second option would be like the high school version. What if local college students at Argosy, U of Phoenix, or others could play basketball at any local college that offers that sport? Is this even possible that sometime down the road an ACLU type of organization could bring a lawsuit forcing the NCAA to allow these people to play and claim discrimination based on financial issues?


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mathguy
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Re: I am as sober as I can be when I bring this wacky thing up

Postby mathguy » Thu Aug 09, 2018 8:13 pm

I would generally assume that yes, a distance learning student is eligible to play on sports teams for that school - this isn't like a homeschool situation, that student is actually a full time enrolled student at the school they would be playing for. Why should it matter if they sit in a physical classroom or take their courses online?

Now, for a school like U of Phoenix that specializes in distance learning ... good luck getting approved for NCAA status.

Your second more HS version will never happen. The "U of Phoenix" students simply aren't students at "UT" (or other college). The weirdness in HS comes from the fact that every HS student - privately, publicly, charter schooled or homeschooled - *IS* districted to a local public school which is required to offer the student services (if the student chooses to use them). Some states (like Florida) have interpreted this to mean a homeschooled student still has the right to participate in athletics at their home school and take advantage of those school offerings that they otherwise could not have in a homeschool environment. Other states (like Kentucky) have basically said if you don't go to the school, you don't play for the school. With colleges, there is no college required to offer a student services - certainly not without the student paying them. So the whole discussion is moot.

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Re: I am as sober as I can be when I bring this wacky thing up

Postby smdore » Thu Aug 09, 2018 8:31 pm

mathguy wrote: Some states (like Florida) have interpreted this to mean a homeschooled student still has the right to participate in athletics at their home school and take advantage of those school offerings that they otherwise could not have in a homeschool environment. Other states (like Kentucky) have basically said if you don't go to the school, you don't play for the school. With colleges, there is no college required to offer a student services - certainly not without the student paying them. So the whole discussion is moot.


Interestingly enough, the discussion is not entirely moot. I attended a fine arts college that did not offer intercollegiate sports. But we were in a consortium with other fine arts schools, and with a college that did offer NCAA Division III sports. I ran track/cross country on this college's team, despite never registering for a class there. In our particular situation, this was actually not uncommon; the most successful of my four years there saw 4/7 varsity xc runners coming from the fine arts schools, and not actually from the college whose name was plastered on our jersey.

Obviously, this was a non-revenue, D3 sport...but the NCAA still permitted (and does still permit) students to compete for a university that they never attend, at least in certain circumstances.

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BelleVUe
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Re: I am as sober as I can be when I bring this wacky thing up

Postby BelleVUe » Fri Aug 10, 2018 5:28 am

There are some private high schools in New Mexico that are not big enough to field football teams. They play 8-man football, and they still don't always have enough males available.

So, they allow kids from one private school to play for another private school's football team. In this case, they are not zoned for the other private school.
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Matheta
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Re: I am as sober as I can be when I bring this wacky thing up

Postby Matheta » Fri Aug 10, 2018 12:27 pm

In Tennessee I had a couple of my students in a public school play basketball for a Community Christian school. A major point was that the Xi'an school was not a member of TSSAA.






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